If you were teaching your friend rugby what 3…

Discussion in 'Arts' started by Ngdmienphi, May 27, 2019.

  1. Ngdmienphi

    Ngdmienphi New Member

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    If you were teaching your friend rugby what 3 tips would you give about effectively passing a rugby ball
     
  2. Claiman

    Claiman New Member

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    1Stick to your position instead of switching frequently. You will never make a good player if suddenly you move from prop to center. Each position has its own requirements and needs, and you won't become a better player if you switch positions just as you're learning one of them well. You should, however, have a basic understanding of each of your teammate's positions. Rugby is a fluid, fast game, and you can best support your teammates if you know what they're trying to do. If you're uncomfortable with your role on the field, check out diagrams of each position and its role. Become a Better Rugby Player Step 2. Jpg 2Play as a unit, not as a superstar or a hero. Do not try to be a hero, just play the game and do what your position is designed to do. There are 30 players on the field at any time in a game of rugby — making it nearly impossible for one player to try and win the game on their own. Successful rugby teams are filled with players who know their role and stick to it. Each position is designed to compliment the others. If you decide you want to start rucking as a scrum-half, you may win a few more lose balls. Your fly-half, however, will lose the connection that gets him the ball, effectively destroying your offense. Everyone will leave position occasionally for a tackle or run. The key is choosing your moment wisely — will you be putting your team at a disadvantage by leaving? [1]3Support your team's runs by staying diagonally behind the ball carrier. If your teammate is on a run, the best place to be is a few yards behind them and a few yards to their side. This makes you a viable, legal passing target at all times. If someone is already there, set up alongside them, providing a quick passing outlet should they get the ball. The best teams set up these small diagonal passing lines almost instantly. If there is already a small line of players, stay just behind them, ready to ruck if one goes down, or take a short offload pass as they're falling.[2]4Keep your head up and scanning at all times, even in tackles. The best way to improve your on-field intelligence is to keep tabs on everything. Are you in line with your teammates? Are the opponents overloading more people on one side of the field for an attack? You should keep your head up on tackles too — watching the contact the whole time to safely place your head and adjust to defenders.[3]Grab any loose ball you see, or fall on it and place it for a ruck. Are you in step with your teammates? Make sure your lines are tight and there are no holes.5Make ball possession your first priority. In rugby, any team can grab possession at almost any time, and offense switches to defense on the fly. This makes it much more crucial to hold onto the ball, tiring the other team on defense until a good scoring opportunity arises. While all good teams take occasional risks, the majority of their efforts are spent keeping the ball. If you don't have any support, slow down and wait for it. You can keep the ball in the ruck a little longer while your team catches up, or skip out on a risky run up the sideline until you have someone to pass to or ruck for you. Only make passes you know will connect. If you don't have a good pass, simply go into contact, let your teammates ruck, and reset. Don't be worried if you go 3-4 plays without gaining a lot of ground. Being on defense is much more tiring than offense, and you'll expose a hole eventually.6Know when to commit to a ruck and when to set up outside. Beginners often aren't sure when they should join the ruck, and will often either jump into every single ruck they find or never join in at all. Knowing when to bind on and help your team can be tough to decide, but there are some guidelines: If you're winning a ruck as a team, don't join in. Similarly, if you've already lost or almost lost a ruck, get out of there and defend the rest of the field. If you see a teammate get tackled there are more defenders than teammates, get over quickly in order to defend possession. If you're near a stalemating ruck, throw yourself in to turn the tide. Scrum-halfs and fly-halfs, with a few exceptions (losing a crucial ruck, the only player near enough to join) should stay out of most rucks — they are too essential for organizing the offense and defense to be rucking.[4]
     

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